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Home > Safety Guidelines > Asian Dust
 
 
 
 When Asian dust has been forecast
At home
Tune in to weather reports on the television, Internet, and radio.
Since Asian dust causes such conditions as allergic conjunctivitis, rhinitis, and bronchial asthma, children and the infirm or elderly should refrain from going outside.
Vulnerable persons, e.g. the infirm or elderly or those with respiratory diseases, should avoid any outdoor activity.
Wash hands and feet thoroughly immediately after returning home.
Wash vegetables and fruits thoroughly.
To prevent Asian sand from getting indoors, check the windows and other potential points of entry.
- Prepare an indoor air purifier, humidifier, etc.
- When going out, use protective glasses, mask, clothes with long sleeves, etc.
- Put unwrapped food into sealed containers to prevent contamination.
What is Asian dust?  
So-called Asian dust or Yellow Sand refers to the phenomenon of fine sandy dust, chiefly from the arid and semi-arid areas of northern China and Mongolia, that is carried by the wind, spreading through the atmosphere and covering the sky, then slowly descending. It most frequently occurs from the months of March to May. Occasionally, strong westerly winds carry it over the Korean peninsula and onward to Japan, the Pacific Ocean, and even North America.
In educational institutions
Analyze weather forecast from the Korea Meteorological Administration and deliberate whether to suspend classes or not.
- Ensure that the students' emergency contact network system is in place.
- If classes are cancelled, encourage children whose parents both work outside the home to do self-study in school.
Provide students and parents with guidance and tips on how to deal with the hazards of yellow sand/Asian dust.
In areas for livestock or horticulture
Prepare to move livestock from paddocks or pastures into a covered shelter.
Prepare coverings to protect straw/hay for livestock feed that is stacked or lying on the ground.
Inspect equipment used for cleaning off yellow sand/Asian dust, e.g., power sprayers.
Inspect doors and windows of facilities like plastic greenhouses and hothouses.
Businesses such as manufacturers should not stack goods and products outdoors. If doing so is unavoidable, the items must be covered.
 When an Asian dust advisory/warning is in effect
At home
Close the windows to prevent Asian sand from getting indoors. Vulnerable persons, e.g. the infirm and elderly or those with respiratory diseases, should avoid any outdoor activity.
Avoid going outside if possible. If it is absolutely necessary to go out, wear protective glasses, mask, and long sleeves. After returning home, immediately wash hands and feet thoroughly and brush your teeth.
Drink water frequently and keep indoor air clean with air purifiers and humidifiers.
Before preparing agricultural or marine products that have been exposed to yellow sand, e.g., vegetables, fruits, and fish, wash them thoroughly.
To prevent secondary contamination, wash hands thoroughly when preparing or cooking food.
In educational institutions
Ban outdoor activities for kindergarteners and elementary school students, and consider shortening school hours or closing schools.
- Suspend or postpone special outside activities like field trips and sports events.
In areas for livestock or horticulture
To prevent their exposure to yellow sand, shelter livestock in covered barns rather than leaving them outside in paddocks or pastures.
Close doors and windows of barns and stables to minimize contact with external air and entry of yellow sand.
Use tarps or plastic sheets to cover straw/hay for livestock feed that is stacked or lying on the ground.
Close doors and windows of facilities like plastic greenhouses and hothouses.
Businesses such as manufacturers should adjust their work schedules and pay special attention to product packaging and cleanliness to prevent damage such as increased defects, mechanical failure, etc.
 After Asian dust has passed
At home
Ventilate the house to change stale indoor air.
Before using any items exposed to and contaminated by yellow sand, wash them thoroughly.
In educational institutions
Remove dust by cleaning the school inside and outside.
Monitor the condition of student health, and allow students suffering from disorders like colds, eye trouble, and itching skin to take it easy or go home early, and urge them to consult a specialist.
Inoculate students against infectious diseases that may result from exposure to yellow sand/Asian dust, and disinfect areas where students gather, e.g. cafeterias.
In areas for livestock or horticulture
Clean and disinfect plastic greenhouses, barns, feeding troughs in pastures, equipment that comes into contact with livestock, etc.
After dusting off yellow sand adhering to livestock, fumigate the animals.
Monitor the occurrence of any diseases for 2 weeks following yellow sand.
Immediately report any signs of foot-and-mouth disease in the livestock.
Criteria for issuance of Asian dust advisories and warnings

Asian dust advisory: When the average hourly dust (PM10) concentration is expected to exceed 400/ over a period of at least 2 hours

Asian dust warning: When the average hourly dust (PM10) concentration is expected to exceed 800/ over a period of at least 2 hours


phone information Information : Creative Administration Division / Woo So-young / banya01@korea.kr
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